Non-Catholic Errors

  • Against Heresies [Or, Refutation and Overthrow of Knowledge falsely so-called ], by St. Irenaeus of Lyons (c.180 AD), trans. Alexander Roberts and William Rambaut; from Ante-Nicene Fathers, Vol. 1, eds. Alexander Roberts, James Donaldson, and A. Cleveland Coxe (Buffalo, NY: Christian Literature Publishing Co., 1885). Available on New Advent (rev. and ed. Kevin Knight), with active links to relevant Catholic Encyclopedia articles and Scripture passages; and on The Augustine Club. On Apologetics, Salvation, Heresy, Cosmology, Gnosticism, Divine Revelation, Bishops, Roman Primacy, Tradition, Sacraments, etc. [NB, A defense of Christianity against Gnosticism, which also shows that the early Church had a Catholic view of sacramental grace, the Roman primacy, the bishops as successors of the apostles, etc. Books I and II are somewhat difficult summaries of Gnostic errors, so it may be better to start with Book III, which begins the summary of Christian teaching.]
  • [Against the Errors of the Greeks] Contra Errores Graecorum, by St. Thomas Aquinas, O.P., translated by Peter Damian Fehlner, F.I., re-edited and missing chapters supplied by Joseph Kenny, O.P. May be read online at DHS Priory of the Immaculate Conception.
  • Answers to a Jewish enquirer, by Théodore Ratisbonne (London: Catholic Truth Society, 1920). Available at Internet Archive.
  • The Bible and the Rule of Faith, by Abbe Louis Nazaire Bégin, translated by G.M. Ward (London, Burns and Oates; Quebec: John Barrow, 1875). With Imprimatur. Available in various formats at Internet Archive and Open Library.
  • The Catholic Church and the Counter-Faith, by Philip Trower (Family Publications). May be read online at Christendom Awake (The webpage states: “Family Publications has now ceased trading. The copyright has reverted to the author Philip Trower who has given permission for the book to be placed on this website. Further chapters will be added as time permits.”) Background information is available at this page, which states that the author “explores the root and branches of the intellectual and spiritual malaise in the West today and how they have affected Catholic philosophy and theology.”
  • A Catholic Critique of Jehovah’s Witnesses (Knights of Columbus, 1963). Available at Internet Archive in multiple formats.
  • Catholic Moral Teaching and its Antagonists Viewed in the Light of Principle and of Contemporaneous History, by Joseph Mausbach, translated from the 6th edition by Anna M. Buchanan (New York: J. F. Wagner, 1914). With Imprimatur. Available on Open Library and Internet Archive (Digitizing sponsor: MSN; Book contributor: Kelly Library, University of Toronto).
  • “Catholic Theology in the Thirteenth Century and the Origins of Secularism”, Rik Van Nieuwenhove, Irish Quarterly, vol. 75 no. 4, pp. 339-354 (November 2010). May be read or downloaded in PDF format at SAGE Journals.
  • Certain difficulties felt by Anglicans in Catholic teaching considered: in a letter addressed to the Rev. E.B. Pusey, on occasion of his Eirenicon of 1864; and in a letter addressed to the Duke of Norfolk, on occasion of Mr. Gladstone’s Expostulation of 1874, by John Henry Newman, 1801-1890 (London : Pickering, 1876). Available on Internet Archive and Open Library (Book contributor: University of Toronto).
  • The chief points of difference between the Catholic and Protestant creeds, by F. Laun. (New York: J. F. Wagner, 1915). With Imprimatur. May be read online or downloaded in multiple formats at Open Library.
  • The Church; or, What do Anglicans Mean by the Church? Second edition, by John B. Bagshawe (London: Catholic Truth Society, 1899). With Imprimatur. Available in various formats at Internet Archive.
  • The Condition of Catholics under James I: Father Gerard’s Narrative of the Gunpowder Plot. Edited, With His Life, By John Morris (London: Longmans, Green, & Co., 1871). Available on Project Gutenberg.
  • Cromwell in Ireland, a history of Cromwell’s Irish campaign, by Denis Murphy (Dublin, Gill, 1902). Available at Open Library and (Digitizing sponsor: Boston College Libraries, Book contributor: Boston College Libraries).
  • Dark pages of English history: being a short account of the penal laws against Catholics from Henry the eighth to George the fourth, by Willington, J. R. (John Ralph) (London: Art and Book Co., 1902). Available at Internet Archive (Digitizing sponsor: MSN, Book contributor: University of California Libraries).
  • Eight lectures on the Position of Catholics in England, by Blessed John Henry Newman (London: Catholic Truth Society, 1890). Available on Internet Archive .
  • The exercise of faith impossible except in the Catholic Church, by William G. Penny (1846). Available at Internet Archive and Open Library. [NB, No Imprimatur, but the content appears to be a faithful restatement of Catholic teaching in response to Protestant objections, as well as an explanation of why the author was moved by grace to become Catholic.]
  • The Fundamental Fallacy of Socialism: an Essay on the Question of Landownership, Comprising an Authentic Account of the Famous McGlynn Case, edited by Arthur Preuss (St. Louis, Mo.; Freiburg (Baden): B. Herder, 1908). With Imprimatur. Available in various formats at Internet Archive and Open Library
  • Heretics, by G.K. Chesterton. Available in multiple formats at Manybooks.
  • Historical sketch of the persecutions suffered by the Catholics of Ireland under the rule of Cromwell and the Puritans, by Patrick Francis Moran (Dublin; London: M.H. Gill, 1884). Available at Open Library and Internet Archive (Digitizing sponsor: MSN, Book contributor: Kelly Library, University of Toronto).
  • The History of Heresies and Their Refutation, by St. Alphonsus Maria de Liguori. Available in PDF format at Documenta Catholica Omnia, and may be downloaded in PDF format through the Saints’ Books index,
  • A History of the Protestant “reformation” in England and Ireland, showing how that event has impoverished and degraded the main body of the people in those countries. In a series of letters addressed to all sensible and just Englishmen, by William Cobbett (London: C. Clement, 1824) Available at ManyBooks.net in multiple formats. Also available at Open Library and Internet Archive. History, Protestantism, Monasticism. [N.B.: Cobbett was not a Catholic, but amidst the fight for Catholic Emancipation against the oppression of Protestant England, he published this work to break English historical prejudice.]
  • [Letter to William Palmer, 2nd] Second Letter to the Rev. William Palmer, M.A., of Worcester College, Oxford: demonstratively proving the Church of England to be an heretical and schismatical church, the mere creature of human invention, by Verax, a Catholic layman (London: T. Jones, 1841). Available in various formats at Internet Archive and Open Library.
  • [Letter to William Palmer, 3rd] Third letter to the Rev. William Palmer, M.A., of Worcester College, Oxford: on auricular confession, and the absolute necessity thereof; also the nullity of the Church of England’s ordinations, notes, etc., by Verax, a Catholic layman (London: T. Jones, 1841). Available in various formats at Internet Archive and Open Library.
  • Luther’s own statements concerning his teaching and its results, Taken exclusively from the earliest and best editions of Luther’s German and Latin works , by Martin Luther, 3rd ed. by Henry C. O’Connor. (New York: Benziger Brothers, 1885) With the approbation of various bishops. Available in various formats at Open Library and Internet archive with a second copy at Open Library and Internet Archive. NB, Recommended for Catholics and non-Catholics alike.
  • Luther, Volume 1, by Hartmann Grisar, translated by E. M. Lamond, ed. Luigi Cappadelta (London: Kegan Paul, Trench, Trübner, 1913?). With Imprimatur. Available at Open Library [NB, though the index page incorrectly shows the title page of volume 5]. The 2nd ed. (1914) is also available at Internet Archive. Another copy marked 2nd edition [no date, but with Imprimatur dated 1914] is also available at Internet Archive.
  • Luther, Volume 2, by Hartmann Grisar, translated by E. M. Lamond, ed. Luigi Cappadelta (London: Kegan Paul, Trench, and Trübner, 1913). With Imprimatur. Available at Internet Archive (Digitizing sponsor: MSN, Book contributor: Robarts Library University of Toronto)
  • Luther, Volume 3, by Hartmann Grisar, translated by E. M. Lamond, ed. Luigi Cappadelta (London: Kegan Paul, Trench, Trübner, 1914). With Imprimatur. Available at Internet Archive
  • Luther, Volume 4, by Hartmann Grisar, translated by E. M. Lamond, ed. Luigi Cappadelta (London: Kegan Paul, Trench, and Trübner, 1915). With Imprimatur. Available at Internet Archive
  • Luther, Volume 5, by Hartmann Grisar, translated by E. M. Lamond, ed. Luigi Cappadelta (London: Kegan Paul, Trench, and Trübner, 1916). With Imprimatur. Available at Internet Archive
  • Luther, Volume 6, by Hartmann Grisar, translated by E. M. Lamond, ed. Luigi Cappadelta (London: Kegan Paul, Trench, and Trübner, 1917). With Imprimatur. Available at Internet Archive.
  • Modernism, by Cardinal Mercier, Archbishop of Malines, translated from the French by Marian Lindsay (St Louis, Mo.: B Herder; London: Burns & Oates. 1912). May be read online at St Athanasius Press’s Traditional Catholic Library.
  • Peter’s rock in Mohammed’s flood: from St. Gregory the Great to St. Leo III, being the Seventh Volume of The Formation of Christendom, by Thomas William Allies (London: Burns & Oates; New York: Catholic Publications Society, 1890). Available at Open Library and Internet Archive (Digitizing sponsor: MSN, Book contributor: Kelly Library, University of Toronto). History, Islam.
  • Priest and parson: or, Let us be one, by Fogarty, James Henry. (New York: Christian Press Association, 1908). With Imprimatur. Available at Internet Archive (Contribited by Kelly Library, University of Toronto).
  • The Roots of the Reformation, by Karl Adam, translated by Cecily Hastings (New York: Canterbury Books; Sheed and Ward Inc.). With 1951 Imprimatur. Available on EWTN Library.
  • Some Lies and Errors of History, by Reuben Parsons (Notre Dame, Ind., Office of the “Ave Maria”, 1893). Available at Internet Archive and Open Library [N.B.–This is a collection of articles refuting the various “Black Legends” used to calumniate Catholics: the civilization of Latin (Medieval) Europe, the Eastern schisms, the case of Galileo, the Inquisition, holy wars, St. Bartolomew’s Day, the career of Pope Alexander VI and Cardinal Richelieu, and “the man in the iron mask”.]
  • Symbolik: oder Darstellung der dogmatischen gegensätze der Katholiken und protestanten nach ihren öffentlichen bekenntnisschriften, by Johann Adam Möhler (Mainz, Vienna: Florian Kupferberg, 1833). Available at Internet Archive. The 1843 edition is available at Internet Archive.
  • Symbolism: or, Exposition of the Doctrinal Differences between Catholics and Protestants as Evidenced by their Symbolical Writings, by John Adam Möhler, translated by James Burton Robertson (London: Charles Dolman, 1843). From Johann Adam Möhler’s Symbolik: oder Darstellung der dogmatischen gegensätze der Katholiken und protestanten nach ihren öffentlichen bekenntnisschriften. Volume 1 is available at Internet Archive and Open Library. Volume 2 is available at Internet Archive. The American edition (New York: Edward Dunigan, 1844) combining the two volumes in one is available at Internet Archive and Open Library.
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