Check out these other ebooks and essays relating to the Benedictine Tradition, which are posted in observance of the Memorial of Saint Benedict of Nursia, Patriarch of Latin Monasticism and Co-Patron of Europe, in the Ordinary Form of the Roman Rite.. Please note that this list is a work in progress, and more will be added:

On Saint Benedict

On the Rule of Saint Benedict

  • The Rule of St. Benedict – Latin and English Edition May be downloaded in PDF format through the Saints’ Books index.
  • Rule of St. Benedict: a commentary by the Right Rev. Dom Paul Delatte, Abbot of Solesmes and Superior-General of the Congregation of the Benedictines in France, translated by Dom Justin McCann, monk of Ampleforth (London: Burns Oates & Washbourne, 1921). With Imprimatur. Available in various formats at Open Library and Internet Archive.

On Benedictine Music

  • A Grammar of Plainsong: in two parts, by the Benedictines of Stanbrook [Abbey] (London: Burns & Oates, Art & Book Co.; New York, Cincinnati, Chicago: Benziger Brothers, 1905). With Imprimatur. Available at Open Library and Internet Archive.
  • Gregorian music: an outline of musical palæography illustrated by fac-similes of ancient manuscripts, by the Benedictines of Stanbrook [Abbey] (London; Leamington: Art and Book Company; New York: Benziger Brothers 1897). Available at Internet Archive and Open Library.
  • Liber usualis, Missae et officii pro Dominicis et festis duplicibus: cum cantu Gregoriano, editio Solemensis [Liber usualis, of Mass and the office for Sundays and double feasts, with Gregorian chant, edition of the Benedictine Monastery Solesmes] (Rome, Tournai: Society of Saint John the Evangelist/Descleé, Lefebvre & Co., Publishers to the Holy See and Printers to the Sacred Congregation of Rites, 1903). With Imprimatur, and with letter of approbation from Pope Leo XIII addressed to Paul Delatte, O. S. B., Abbot of Solesmes. Available at Internet Archive. The 1924 edition (with modern notation with a five line staff, publisher number 780c) is available in PDF format at Quilisma Publications.
  • The Liber Usualis, with Introduction and Rubrics in English, edited by the Benedictines of Solesmes (Tournai, Belgium; New York: Desclee Company, Printers to the Holy See and the Sacred Congregation of Rites, 1961) May be downloaded in PDF format at Musica Sacra and at Sancta Missa (online publication provided by the Church Music Association of America). Sancta Missa describes the Liber Usualis thus: “Gregorian Chant for Every Mass of the Year: The Liber Usualis contains the complete Latin settings of Gregorian Chant for every Mass of the year (Sundays, Solemnities, Commons and Feasts) as well as for Nuptial Masses, Requiem Masses, Holy Week, and Ordination. Additionally it provides much of the Gregorian Chant to be sung in Latin for the Divine Office (Vespers, Compline, etc.), as well as many other traditional Latin chants and hymns (Litanies, Benediction, etc.).”
  • A manual of Gregorian chant compiled from the Solesmes books and from ancient manuscripts, (Rome, Tournai (Belgium): Society of Saint John the Evangelist/Desclee, Lefebvre & Co., Publishers to the Holy See and Printers to the Sacred Congregation of Rites, 1903). With Imprimatur. Also with approbation from Pope Leo XIII addressed to Abbot Paul Delatte, O. S. B., of Solesmes. Available at Internet Archive and Open Library (which reports: “Includes the Ordinary of the Mass in Latin with an English paraphrase by Dom Gueranger, and a commentary in English on the religious service.”)
  • A New School of Gregorian Chant, by the Rev. Dom. Dominic Johner. O.S.B. 2d English edition, translated from the 3d rewritten & enlarged German edition by Rev. W. A. Hofler. (Ratisbon, Rome, New York, Cincinnati: F. Pustet, 1914). With Imprimatur. Available at Internet Archive and Open Library, which notes: “Music in plainchant and white notation. Translation of Neue Schule des gregorianischen Choralgesanges.”
  • Recent research in plainsong: a paper read to the members of the Plainsong and Mediæval Music Society, by Henry Bremridge Briggs (London: Vincent, 1898). Available at Open Library and Internet Archive. (N.B., The book has no Imprimatur, but the work has no apparent heterodoxy and the topic relates to the Church. The author is possibly a High Church Anglican and cites the musical research of the Benedictines of Solesmes.)
  • The work of the Benedictines of Solesmes in the plainsong revival, by Henry Bremridge Briggs (London: Harrison and Sons, 1899). Available at Open Library and Internet Archive.  (N.B., The book has no Imprimatur, but the work has no apparent heterodoxy and the topic relates to the Church, specifically the musical research of the Benedictines of Solesmes. The author is possibly a High Church Anglican.)

On Modern Benedictine Education

  • The Development of Catholic Identity as Applied to Our Students’ Education (paper), (Benedictine University, August 26, 2005). Available in PDF format on this page of Benedictine University’s Center for Mission and Identity. [It appears to have been written by the Steering Committee of the Center for Mission and Identity, composed of Alicia Cordoba Tait (Chair), Al Martin and Martin Tracey (Co-Chairs), Kevin Doyle, Julie Dugger, Patrick Flynn, James Iaccino, Daniel Julius, Eileen Kolich, Philip Timko, OSB, David Turner, OSB, Susan Mikula, and John Mickus (Committee Members).]

On Monasticism in General

  • Monasticism and civilization, by John Bonaventure O’Connor (New York, P. J. Kenedy, 1921). With Nihil Obstat [from the ubiquitous Arthur Scanlan] and Imprimatur. Available at Internet Archive and Open Library (Digitizing sponsor: Google, Book from the collections of: New York Public Library).
  • How the Catholic Church Built Western Civilization, by Thomas E. Woods, Jr. (Regnery History, 2005). Chapter 3 (“How the Monks Saved Civilization”) is available in PDF format at this page of The Church in History.
  • The Ideal of the Monastic Life Found in the Apostolic Age, by Germain Morin, translated by C. Gunning, with a preface by Dom Bede Camm (London: R. & T. Washbourne, 1914). With Imprimatur. Available on Internet Archive and Open Library (Digitizing sponsor: MSN; Book contributor: Regis College Library, University of Toronto).
  • “The Economics of Monasticism” (paper), by Nathan Smith, Department of Economics, George Mason University (September 6, 2009). Part of the ASREC/ARDA Working Paper Series. Available in PDF format at this page of the Association of Religion Data Archives. Its abstract on this page notes: “…Monasteries, in principle and largely in practice, are a form of society based on consent of the governed, unlike liberal states which preach but do not practice consensual governance, and it is interesting to juxtapose the real, live ‘social contracts’ of the monasteries with the notional social contracts of liberal political theory.” [N.B., The paper applies secular economic analysis to monasticism and demonstrates why it has contributed so much to civilization. I’m still trying to determine Mr. Smith’s religion, but his paper seems orthodox.]

Other works written by Benedictines

  • A Calendar of Scottish Saints, Second Edition Revised & Augmented, by Dom Michael Barrett, O.S.B. (Fort-Augustus: Abbey Press, 1919). With Imprimatur. Available in many formats at Manybooks.net.
  • Come Holy Spirit – Help Us To Pray, by Benedict Heron OSB (1997). May be read online at Christendom Awake.
  • A Commentary on the New Code of the Canon Law (all volumes), by Dom Charles Augustine Bachofen, O.S.B., D.D. (St. Louis, Mo., London, B. Herder Book Co., 1918). With an introduction by Cardinal Gasquet on Vol III. Available at Internet Archive (Book contributor: Google & University of Wisconsin), which states: “This is a commentary of the 1917 Pio-Benedictine Code of Canon Law. For each canon it contains the Latin original, sometimes followed by an English translation, and finally Dom Augustine’s detailed commentary.
  • I Saw Satan Fall: The Ways of Spiritual Warfare, by Benedict Heron, OSB (1997). May be read online at Christendom Awake.
  • Lenten sermons, by Augustine Wirth, O.S.B. (Elizabeth, NJ, 1891). Available on Open Library and Internet Archive (Digitizing sponsor: MSN; Book contributor: Kelly Library, University of Toronto).
  • Praying for Healing: The Challenge, by Benedict Heron, OSB. With Foreword by the Rt. Revd Maurice Taylor, Bishop of Galloway. May be read online at Christendom Awake. [N.B., the webpage is incorrectly labelled “I Saw Satan Fall: The Ways of Spiritual Warfare”]

Other works edited or translated or with an introduction by Benedictines

  • Abandonment to Divine Providence, by Jean Pierre de Caussade, S.J., edited by Re. J. Ramiere, S.J., introduction by Dom Arnold, O.S.B., third English edition translated from the tenth complete French edition by E.J. Strickland (Exeter: Sydney Lee, Ltd., catholic Records Press; St. Louis, Mo.: B. Herder Book Co.). With Imprimatur dated 1921. Internet Archive and Open Library.
  • The Catholic Controversy, by Saint Francis de Sales, Bishop and Doctor of the Church, translated by Rev. Henry Benedict Mackey, O.S.B.  (London: Burns and Oates, 1886). May be read online at Good Catholic Books. The 3rd revised and augmented edition, with an excellent translator’s preface (New York, Cincinnati, Chicago: Benziger Brothers; London: Burns and Oates, 1909) (Library of St. Francis De Sales, volume III) is available in various formats at Internet Archive.
  • The Book of Saints: a dictionary of servants of God canonized by the Catholic Church, extracted from the Roman & other martyrologies, compiled by the Benedictine monks of St. Augustine’s Abbey, Ramsgate (London: A. & C. Black, Ltd., 1921). With Imprimatur. Available at Internet Archive and Open Library.
  • Explanation of the Epistles and Gospels for the Sundays, Holydays and Festivals throughout the Eccesiastical Year; to which are added Instructions on Christian Faith and Morals, Explanations of Different Ceremonies and Practices of the Church, and the lives of many Saints, by Rev. Leonard Goffine, edited by Rev. George Ott, translated by Rev. Gerard M. Pilz, O.S.B. (New York, Cincinnati: Frederick Pustet & Co., 1871). With the approbation of the Right Rev. Bishop of Ratisbon. Available at Internet Archive and Open Library. The 51st edition (Ratisbon, Rome, New York, Cincinnati: Frederick Pustet & Co., 1890) with the approbation and imprimatur of many bishops, is available at Internet Archive and Open Library.
  • The Glories of Divine Grace: a free rendering of the original treatise of P. Eusebius Nieremberg, S. J, by Matthias Joseph Scheeben, translated from the fourth revised German edition by a Benedictine Monk of St. Meinrad’s Abbey, Ind., with the consent of the author and the permission of the superior (New York, Cincinnati, St. Louis: Benziger Brothers; London: R. Washbourne; Dublin: M.H. Gill & Son, 1886). With Imprimatur for the original and approbation for the translation. Available at Open Library and Internet Archive.
  • New Jerusalem Bible (1985). With Imprimatur. Available at Catholic Online.  Translated “directly from the Hebrew, Greek or Aramaic,” under general editor Very Rev. Dom (Joseph) Henry Wansbrough, OSB.
  • The Spirit of Catholicism, by Karl Adam. Available at EWTN Library. [NB: This book, which appears to be the text Adam translated by Dom Justin McCann, O.S.B., is highly recommended by Dave Armstrong and Scott Hahn. Having read it repeatedly myself, I heartily agree with their approbation.] Dogma, Grace, Salvation, Church.
  • On Union with God, by Saint Magnus Albertus, 1193-1280, with notes by P. J Berthier, translated by a Benedictine of Princethorpe Priory (London: R. & T. Washbourne, 1911). With Imprimatur. Available on Internet Archive and Open Library (Digitizing sponsor: MSN; Book contributor: Regis College Library, University of Toronto).
  • The way of perfection, 2nd ed., translated from the autograph of Saint Teresa of Jesus by the Benedictines of Stanbrook including all the variants from the Escorial and Valladolid editions; revised with notes and an introduction by F. Benedict Zimmerman; with additional notes by the translator. (London: Baker, 1919). Available at Open Library with a 2nd copy here and a 3rd copy here.
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